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How to Benefit from Exercise When You Have Arthritis

Is arthritis pain causing you to turn into a couch potato? Being inactive can actually make your condition much worse. If you fail to move your joints regularly, they can stiffen, swell, and make you hesitate to set a foot outside much less go for a brisk walk. 

At MidJersey Orthopaedics Flemington and Bridgewater, New Jersey, our expert team provides a comprehensive array of arthritis treatments to help joint pain sufferers get their lives back and enjoy being active and mobile. 

Best types of exercise for arthritis sufferers

If you have arthritis, exercise can help you keep your mobility and flexibility. If you don't move at all, your joints can stiffen, and your condition will worsen. Even a small amount of exercise every day is better than none. You don't have to "exercise" according to any specific regimen -- any moderate level of activity will do. 

The CDC recommends low-impact aerobic activities that won't put stress on your joints. These can include:

Every week, plan on two and a half hours of moderate-intensity aerobic exercise (you should be able to talk but not sing) or one and a quarter hours of vigorous-intensity aerobic activity (you should find talking difficult.) You can do some moderate and some vigorous activities; just remember that a minute of vigorous-intensity activity is roughly equal to two minutes of moderate-intensity activity.

Benefits of exercise for arthritis patients

Regular exercise can help you manage your arthritis symptoms and remain mobile and active. A modest exercise routine can:

Our team can help you lay out an exercise routine that will be safe and beneficial for you, to help you control your arthritis pain and give you as much mobility as possible. 

If you need help creating a plan for an active life, call the office located most conveniently to you, or request an appointment using our online scheduler today. 

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